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Concord Drug Crimes Lawyer

Massachusetts takes drug crimes seriously.  A drug conviction in Massachusetts can carry severe consequences ranging from probation and fines to lengthy prison sentences.  If you face drug charges in Concord, you need an aggressive defense attorney like Attorney Chris Spring on your side.

Attorney Spring is:

  • A former Middlesex County prosecutor;
  • Dedicated to his clients and practices only criminal law; and
  • Experienced, having practiced criminal law for two decades.

Let Concord criminal defense attorney Chris Spring use his legal skill and acumen to fight for your legal rights and freedom.  Call Spring & Spring today and schedule your free case consultation. Attorney Spring will travel to your home to meet with you and discuss your options.

How a Drug Crimes Attorney Will Help Your Case

It is imperative to obtain an attorney when charged with a drug crime in Concord.  A drug crimes attorney, like Attorney Chris Spring, will explain the charges you are facing as well as their legal ramifications.  He will listen to your story, gather any relevant evidence, and speak to potential witnesses.

Attorney Spring can also guide you through legal possibilities, including:

  • Challenging particular evidence;
  • Fighting to dismiss one or more charges;
  • Attempting to reduce one or more charges; and
  • Trying your case in front of a jury.

When you retain Attorney Chris Spring, you get a competent professional in the field of criminal law who is available to you nights, weekends, and holidays.  At Spring & Spring, the fees are transparent, and there are no surprise costs to you.

Types of Drug Crimes

In Massachusetts, drug crimes fall under the “Controlled Substances Act.” It is the prosecution’s burden to prove the defendant is guilty of each element of the charged crime beyond a reasonable doubt.

There are several drug crimes, including:

  • Straight drug possession;
  • Possession of drugs with intent to distribute;
  • Drug distribution; and
  • Drug trafficking.

Straight Drug Possession or Intent to Distribute?

Generally, a straight drug possession charge deals with drugs meant for the personal use of the defendant.  Straight drug possession has two elements.  The Commonwealth must prove:

  1. The defendant possessed some perceptible amount of a controlled substance; and 
  2. The defendant possessed the substance, knowingly or intentionally.  Possession can be on the defendant’s actual person or under the defendant’s control (for example, in a car’s glove compartment or in a bedroom dresser drawer).  

Possession of drugs with intent to distribute is a grave charge that can carry jail time for the first conviction, or a mandatory state prison sentence, for repeat convictions.  The elements of possession of drugs with intent to distribute are the following:

  1. The defendant possessed some amount of a controlled substance and intended to distribute it to another person or persons; and 
  2. Did so intentionally or knowingly. 

The prosecutor must prove the defendant’s state of mind (that his plan was to distribute the drugs) in a possession with intent to distribute case. In these cases, the prosecutor typically relies on the following types of evidence to try to establish the drugs were not intended for the defendant’s personal use:

  • The manner in which the drugs were packaged (a defendant who possesses many small baggies of drugs suggests he was planning to distribute them);
  • The defendant’s possession of packaging materials such as empty plastic baggies;
  • The defendant’s possession of a cutting agent such as baking soda;
  • The defendant’s possession of multiple pagers or burner phones;
  • The defendant’s possession of large amounts of cash;
  • The defendant’s possession of ledger sheets; and
  • The absence of drug paraphernalia used to ingest drugs (for example, you would expect a heroin user to possess a needle).

In many cases, drugs are seized by police officers during an unconstitutional search. Attorney Spring will file a motion to suppress any evidence unlawfully obtained by the police.  If the drugs are not suppressed, an experienced drug crimes lawyer will typically argue a personal use defense.

Drug Distribution or Drug Trafficking?

Drug distribution is following through on the intent to distribute drugs.  To convict a defendant of distributing drugs, the Commonwealth must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. The defendant distributed, sold, or gave some amount of a controlled substance to another person or persons; and 
  2. The defendant did so intentionally or knowingly.

The difference between drug distribution and drug trafficking is the weight of the drugs.  Drug trafficking involves more substantial amounts of drugs.  It carries a mandatory prison sentence of up to twelve years, depending on drug type and quantity.  

The elements of drug trafficking are:

  1. The defendant distributed, sold, or gave some perceptible amount of a controlled substance to another person or persons; or possessed a perceptible amount of a controlled substance with the intent to distribute the substance to another person or persons; and
  2. The defendant did so knowingly or intentionally; and 
  3. The drugs exceeded a certain weight.

For specific amounts and drug types, contact a skilled drug crimes defense attorney, like Attorney Chris Spring.  As the owner of Spring & Spring and a dedicated criminal defense attorney, he will defend your rights and attack the prosecution’s case against you.  Choose Attorney Spring and use his knowledge and experience to put yourself in the best possible position to win your drug crimes case, assault case, or domestic violence case